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Hoth


Star Wars på Finse

I mars 1979 ble Finse invadert Hollywood, idet film teamet bak Star Wars II- The Empire Strikes Back skulle gjøre location opptak for planeten Hoth. Finse Hotell ble fylt til randen.

Bildene, som er tatt av fotograf Knut Vadseth, viser opptakene rundt Finse.
Rammene rundt opptakene var tidvis ganske kaotiske, noe følgende dagboksnotater viser:

November 1978:

Empire director Irvin Kershner inspects the glacier where Empire will be shot in Finse. He is stranded after a helicopter malfunctions and must walk four miles in 20-below-zero weather back to the hotel. It is an omen of problems to come with the Finse location

3 March 1979:

First unit cast and crew arrive in Finse

5 March:

Finse cut off from the outside world by a fierce blizzard

7 March:

Harrison Ford arrives the only way possible: in the engine compartment of railroad snow clearance vehicle

14 March:

More blizzards in Finse

10 April:

Carrie Fisher gets the flu and can´t work

Her er slik Finse fremstilles på Star Wars hjemmesider

The Hoth battle sequences were filmed on location atop the Härdangerjøkulen Glacier in Finse, Norway. The locale was located about four miles (6.4 kilometers) from the ski lodge that served as production headquarters. Formed of stark blue ice, and 6,000 feet (1,800 meters) high at its summit, the glacier required very little visual effects work to transform it into the ice planet of Hoth. The production crew had to endure subzero temperatures, chilling winds and the occasional avalanche.

Of Finse, associate producer Robert Watts said, "In clear weather, the glacier provides the uninterrupted, treeless expanse we need for the Hoth scenes. However, a film location must also offer two other essentials: accomodation for the crew and a link with transportation to get people and equipment in and out. Otherwise, filming at the North Pole would be feasible."

After principal photography wrapped in Finse, many of the effects for the Battle of Hoth sequences were completed unsing matte paintings and miniature sets. The artificial snow for the miniatures was a concoction of baking soda and microscopic glass bubbles.

Copie of the report we found in the hotel